R01 Boot Camp
group of researchers talking across table at R01 Boot Camp event

A multifaceted program designed to help faculty members receive their first R01 grants.

The R01 Boot Camp is a multifaceted program designed to help faculty members receive their first R01 grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Senior faculty, with strong track records of NIH funding, guide groups of mentees through the proposal development process, while the team structure encourages peer support and feedback.

Mentees will benefit from early input on research aims to ensure they are addressing significant, innovative, and fundable questions. They will identify needed resources and potential collaborators, and make pre-proposal contact with NIH program officers. They will learn “tricks of the trade” from experienced U-M faculty that can help throughout their careers.

The pilot R01 Boot Camp program was launched in 2013. To date, eight cohorts of nearly 300 mentees have participated in R01 Boot Camp; graduates from the program include representation from all 29 departments in the medical school (including basic, translational, and clinical research), as well as seven additional schools at UM including LS&A, Kinesiology, Engineering and Public Health.

The program was developed as part of a $100 million investment in a long-term Strategic Research Initiative launched by the Dean of the Medical School in June 2012 to align Michigan Medicine around a common research vision. Due to the program’s popularity and success, it continues to be an available and valuable resource to early career faculty.

logo for R01 Boot Camp
How to Apply

The U-M Medical School Office of Research is currently accepting applications for the 2024-25 Cohort of its R01 Boot Camp program. Applications for both mentees and coaches are due on Monday, May 13, 2024. 

Mentees use this Competition Space site to apply.

Coaches use this Competition Space site to apply.

The nine-month program is comprised of the following:

  • Mentees receive specialized training, guidance, and camaraderie as a participant in this 9 month program. Participation is limited to faculty members who have not yet been Principal Investigators on R01 grants.
  • Faculty coaches with established track records of external funding and a commitment to mentoring, who meet with and advise their assigned mentee peer group. Coaches will communicate with the mentees' Department Chairs and the Medical School Office of Research.
  • Activities and resources designed to provide mentees with the tools and knowledge they need to write a successful R01 application (e.g., proposal writing seminar, mock review).
  • Internal Subject Matter Experts who provide counsel on mentees’ research plans, help them prepare and present a Chalk Talk, and review proposal drafts.
  • External Subject Matter Experts who review mentees’ final proposals.

For more information, view the R01 Boot Camp General FAQs.

The R01 Boot Camp was developed by the Medical School Office of Research in consultation with faculty, the Department of Medical Education, the Office of Faculty Affairs, and the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research. R01 Boot Camp is managed by the Grant Services & Analysis unit in the Medical School Office of Research.

Mentees

Mentees of the R01 Boot Camp are grouped into small teams where specialized training, guidance, and camaraderie all aid in the development of a competitive NIH R01 proposal over this 9-month program. Participation is limited to faculty members who have not yet been Principal Investigators on R01 grants.

You'll work with coaches and peers to assess your competitiveness using the research roadmap, and learn how to present your well-conceptualized grant idea persuasively -- which is usually a combination of "offense" and "defense."

  • Learn what reviewers are looking for when they evaluate an R01 proposal. Know what to expect and be prepared! Anticipate weaknesses/criticisms and deflect with well-prepared justifications.
  • Identify the best study section to review your proposal.
  • With the help of your coach and peers, prepare for an interview with your Program Officer.
  • Become a reviewer of your peers’ proposals to role-play the perspective of the reviewers.
  • Prepare and present a Chalk Talk in your department to receive expert feedback on your Specific Aims.
  • In one of the large group sessions you will learn from widely-acclaimed experts at Grant Writers' Seminars about how to “Write Winning Grant Proposals” with a focus on NIH. We will provide you with their workbook, The Grant Application Writer’s Workbook (NIH version), at no cost.

Meet other new investigators from other departments and fields. These small groups will foster camaraderie, stimulate research ideas, and encourage transdisciplinary and translational research.

Mentees FAQs

Participation is limited to faculty members who have not yet been Principal Investigators on R01 grants. Participants should be ready to submit an R01 application within one year, i.e., should already have well-conceptualized specific aims, preliminary data, and possibly foundational funding prior to starting the program.

Applications will be vetted by a group of R01 Boot Camp coaches, and Department Chairs will provide final approval.

While we expect most applicants will be early career faculty members, this is not a requirement.

By signing up for the R01 Boot Camp as a mentee, you will receive:

  • Specialized Training: Enhance your ability to prepare a more impactful and competitive R01 proposal; get 1:1 mentorship from subject matter experts in your research area; meet new potential collaborators in your field
  • Guidance: Assess your strengths and build a research plan to become recognized in your field; learn about NIH policies and best practices from mentors with strong track records of NIH funding
  • Camaraderie: Connect with interdisciplinary peers and experts and jumpstart your research funding; expand your network of colleagues

You will be expected to attend several large group events/workshops (e.g., grant writing workshop, Mock Review); monthly small-group team meetings (you and your coaches and peers will decide the times); and meet with your own subject matter expert (who will have specialized insight into your scientific field of study). Your department will help schedule a Chalk Talk, where you can present and refine your aims.

The mentee is expected to attend large group events (schedule for upcoming program is below):

  • Opening Ceremony (Wednesday, September 13, 2023)
  • All-Day Grant Writing Workshop (Friday, October 20, 2023)
  • TBD Workshop (November 2023)
  • TBD Workshop (March 2024)
  • Mock Review and Closing Ceremony (Wednesday, May 8, 2024)

In between large group events, and as part of your monthly small group meetings, you will:

  1. be led through exercises to identify the skills and resources you need to be competitive,
  2. devise a plan to obtain those skills and resources,
  3. write and refine the sections of a R01 project description, and
  4. receive feedback throughout the development process.

Before submission, we will pay a non-UM reviewer to critique your draft before you send your proposal to NIH.

At the completion of the program, you will have:

  • A plan to fortify your research skills and resources
  • A competitive, well-reviewed R01 (or equivalent) grant application. Together with your coaches and subject matter experts, you will determine a realistic deadline for your R01 submission, and will agree to submit by that deadline
  • Working in small interdisciplinary groups of faculty members will offer additional benefits of learning about other scientific fields and technologies, developing new perspectives, possibly enriching your own study, and providing potential research collaborators

Boot Camp mentees are expected to submit a R01-equivalent proposal within 12 months of program completion. Submission is a requirement of the program and will be verified by the Office of Research.

Additionally, Chairs are asked to acknowledge the timing requirement and commit to financial support of the program if the submission is not sent.

Small group peer mentoring fosters camaraderie, support, and cooperation. Several articles have described the success of peer mentoring in medical schools (e.g., Johnson KS, Hastings SN, Purser JL, Whitson, HE. 2011. The Junior Faculty Laboratory: An innovative model of peer mentoring; Academic Medicine, Vol. 86, No. 12).

An additional benefit is stimulation of interdisciplinary and translational research. We will assign 4-8 faculty members who share some scientific commonality with the coaches (e.g., clinical research, chronic health conditions, etc.), but who come from different departments and represent different scientific perspectives, disciplines, or methodologies.

While coaches are only committed to attending one small group meeting per month, the members of the small group may decide to meet more often on their own.

In the middle and at the end of the academy session, the Office of Research will create an activity report for each mentee and send a copy to Chairs, Associate Chairs for Research, and coaches.

The U-M Institute for Health Policy & Innovation (IHPI) is sponsoring one team within the R01 Boot Camp program. The IHPI team has a health services research focus, and applicants who have related research aims may indicate their interest in joining the IPHI team.

Faculty Coaches (Mentors)

The path to research funding is more complicated, crowded, and competitive than ever before, and the journey can be discouraging (and lonely) without guidance. This program, supported by the Dean and senior leadership at the Medical School, recognizes the importance of good mentoring, and represents an effort to establish a structured annual program that will enable mentoring and research development.

Coach's responsibility:

One or two coaches will be assigned to a group of approximately 4-8 mentees. Coaches will guide the group through NIH policies and practices and the development of an R01 grant application.

In much the same way that a head coach is not an expert on all the positions, an R01 Boot Camp coach is not necessarily an expert on the scientific expertise needed for each mentee’s grant proposal. Rather, the coach is a process expert. We will contract an Internal Subject Matter Expert to each mentee to consult on the scientific content of the proposals.

Small group activities include helping to determine a realistic deadline for each mentee, advising them on developing sections of a proposal, and reviewing proposals in the group. Coaches will help the group find answers to other issues that may surface, such as how to contact NIH Program Officers or how to select a study section. The Office of Research is a resource for coaches, and can arrange for additional expertise when requested by the group.

Each team is self-governing; coaches and group members determine when and where the group will meet. We will provide a dedicated team folder in the R01 Boot Camp U-M Dropbox for team members to upload and share proposal sections for review. Individual team folders are only accessible to designated team members.

Benefits of becoming a coach:

  • Share knowledge you have gained
  • Guide and encourage new researchers
  • Learn about new technologies and discoveries
  • Work in an interdisciplinary/translational group
  • Contribute to the research mission of UMMS
  • Have FUN!
  • Receive $5,000 supplement
Coach FAQs

Required:

  • Attend pre-program Coaches' Orientation (1.5 hrs)
  • Coordinating, cooperating with a co-coach
  • Attend Opening Ceremony and lead table discussions/introductions of assigned peer groups (2 hrs)
  • Attend small peer group meetings once per month (in coordination with co-coach) and lead group through activities and discussions. We will ask coaches to submit dates of meetings so we can include them on mentees' activities reports. (20 hrs)
  • Review research roadmap, specific aims, and final proposals (10-20 hrs)
  • Attend one mid-program progress meeting with other coaches (1.5 hrs)
  • Participate in Mock Review & Closing Ceremony event (2 hrs)
  • Contact Office of Research staff to identify unmet needs of the group
  • Communicate with mentees' Chairs regarding progress as desired/requested

Optional: but highly encouraged:

  • Attend widely acclaimed one-day workshop, "Write Winning Grant Proposals," presented by Grant Writers' Seminars
  • Attend mentees’ departmental Chalk Talks
  • Large Group Workshop
  • Large Group Event
  • Total estimated time commitment is approximately 50-60 hours (excluding optional components).

Small group peer mentoring fosters camaraderie, support, and cooperation. Several articles have described the success of peer mentoring in medical schools (e.g., Johnson KS, Hastings SN, Purser JL, Whitson, HE. 2011. The Junior Faculty Laboratory: An innovative model of peer mentoring; Academic Medicine, Vol. 86, No. 12).

An additional benefit is stimulation of interdisciplinary and translational research. We will assign 4-8 faculty members who share some scientific commonality with the coaches (e.g., clinical research, chronic health conditions), but who come from different departments and represent different scientific perspectives, disciplines, or methodologies.

While coaches are only committed to attending one small group meeting per month, the members of the small group may decide to meet more often on their own.

While the biggest compensation will be the satisfaction of contributing to the success of new investigators, the R01 Boot Camp will provide coaches with a token of our appreciation. Each coach will be compensated $5,000 that will supplement salary.

"I am finding that interacting with the junior faculty and discussing good grant writing strategies and practices is very rewarding! I also think this mechanism gives us an additional way to meet people and discuss possible collaborations, etc. I am very proud of the Medical School for providing this service to our talented junior faculty - and they seem to really appreciate the help also!"  -- Les Satin, Ph.D., Pharmacology

"Learning from each other is fun, and working as a team leads to success."  -- Y. Eugene Chen, M.D., Ph.D., Cardiac Surgery

"The R01 Boot Camp is the strongest attempt I have seen of teaching the art of grant writing to the next generation of independently-funded investigators. It sets a new standard for how academic institutions support and accelerate the independent careers of their young investigators."  -- David Aronoff, M.D., Internal Medicine

We ask that you attend a 1.5-hour Coaches' Orientation, where you will receive a more comprehensive overview of the program and some resources that will help you as coaches. Mentees will be attending the "Write Winning Grant Proposals" workshop presented by Grant Writers' Seminars, and coaches are welcome to attend. All Boot Camp participants will receive a copy of the workbook, The Grant Application Writer’s Workbook (NIH version).

Chairs are interested in the progress of their mentees, and coaches are encouraged to contact them with progress reports or concerns.

In addition, coaches may contact the Office of Research to request assistance with locating resources to meet needs identified by the group throughout their R01 Boot Camp interactions, e.g., names of biostatisticians, speakers from IRBMED or IACUC, etc.

Eligibility for coaches includes:

  • History of funding as a Principal Investigator (PI) on NIH R01 grant applications
  • Rank of associate or full professor
  • Demonstrated interest in mentoring
  • Willingness to comply with the R01 Boot Camp schedule and meet the time commitment

Preference will be given to those faculty members who have served as reviewers on NIH study sections.

Applications will be reviewed by the Office of Research with input from Department Chairs and Associate Chairs for Research.

Selection will be made based on:

  • Strength of experience both as an investigator and a mentor, and
  • Match with scientific composition of mentee applicants

Preference will be given to coaches who have experience serving on an NIH study section; however, this is not a requirement.

The R01 Boot Camp is looking for a diverse cadre of mentors who are willing, above all, to help new investigators prepare good applications – from identifying study sections, contacting Program Officers, and determining the best deadline cycle, to finally submitting a reviewed, competitive proposal.

Experienced R01 Boot Camp coaches will work with the Office of Research to form small groups. Co-coaches are likewise selected to meet group research characteristics. Some factors include type of research (e.g., clinical, basic, outcomes), subject area, and common methodologies.

The Chairs have indicated that they are willing to be contacted regarding the progress of their faculty members. In the middle and at the end of the academy session, the Office of Research will develop an activity report for each mentee and send a copy to both Chair and co-coaches.

The coaches are responsible for content. It is expected that much of the time will be devoted to individual proposal sections as they are developed by the mentees. Coaches should oversee the discussion to assure that discussion is respectful and constructive.

There are also topics that coaches are expected to cover throughout the course of R01 Boot Camp:

  • Contacting the Program Officer
  • Selecting a study section
  • Dealing with reviews, e.g. contacting Scientific Review Officer

One of the primary purposes of the small group is to review sections of the mentees’ proposals as they are developed. Have the mentee circulate their sections in advance and plan ahead for these reviews. 

Additional topics that should be covered as scheduled by the coaches: 

  • Contacting the NIH Program Officer (PO) – how to select, contact, prepare
  • Selecting Study Sections (e.g., match with expertise)
  • Biases of Study Sections (e.g., methodology preference)
  • Identifying primary reviewers and researching their subject expertise and biases (e.g., look at publications)
  • Selecting collaborators
  • Time management and maintaining a writing schedule
  • Communicating with the Scientific Review Officer or PO after the review
  • Tips to write and present information/data succinctly and clearly
Activities & Resources

The Medical School Office of Research has established several resources to help researchers develop successful grant proposals. The R01 Boot Camp is a 9-month program comprised of the following activities and resources.

Timeline for 2024-25 Program

  • Opening Ceremony (Wednesday, September 11, 2024)
  • All- Day Grant Writing Workshop (Friday, October 18, 2024)
  • TBD Workshop (TBD November 2024)
  • TBD Workshop (TBD March 2025)
  • Mock Review and Closing Ceremony (Tuesday, May 6, 2025)

Self-directed interdisciplinary peer group activities of approximately 4-8 faculty members (mentees) and 1-2 coaches (senior faculty members). Mentees share and review proposal sections, provide constructive feedback to one another, and address problems and needs of mutual interest. Coaches provide guidance on NIH policy and practices.

Present a Chalk Talk - A one-hour presentation developed in consultation with the mentee’s department and Internal Subject Matter Expert (ISME) to obtain critical feedback from experienced researchers to help shape the aims of the mentee’s R01 proposal. Chalk Talks should be presented within the first three months of the program to hone Specific Aims for further proposal development.

Consultation with an Internal Subject Matter Expert who will have specialized insight into the mentee’s scientific field of study, and who will provide counsel on mentee’s research plans, help them prepare and present a Chalk Talk, and review proposal drafts. 

External Review - R01 Boot Camp will pay for an External Subject Matter Expert to review full drafts of proposals at least six weeks before the NIH deadline. 

Writing Accountability Groups (optional) - R01 Boot Camp staff will coordinate and facilitate Writing Accountability Groups (WAGs) for mentees in the program.

These optional workshops and activities at the Medical School and across the University of Michigan offer additional opportunities to hone your skills as a researcher. 

  • Faculty Development Workshops - U-M Medical School Faculty Development offers regular workshops for faculty interested in learning more about the research process. Topics include: Essential Skills for Successful Leadership, Making the Most of Your Presentation, and Developing Successful Scientific Papers for Publication.
  • Additional Research Training Opportunities - Discover additional research training opportunities offered by the U-M Medical School Office of Research as well as other U-M units and departments.
  • MICHR Education Events - The Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) provides an extensive selection of courses, workshops, and seminars to the U-M research community. Course offerings include mock review study sections and grant writing workshops.

The Medical School Office of Research has established several resources to help researchers develop successful grant proposals. In addition to your work in the Mentored Research Academy: R01 Boot Camp program, we encourage you to explore these resources to see what may be useful to you.

  • Chalk Talks - An outline to assist mentees in preparing for their Chalk Talk.
  • Research Roadmap - A series of questions to help researchers map out their career strategy.
  • Managing a Research Operation - A page that contains useful knowledge, resources, and tips to assist in the various processes for a new lab or clinical program.

In addition to your work in the Mentored Research Academy: R01 Boot Camp program, we encourage you to explore these resources to see what may be useful to you. 

  • Research Project Route Map - Discover how to navigate the complexities of the research enterprise at the University of Michigan.
  • Medical School Grant Proposal Sampler - This is a repository of successful proposals and proposal sections donated by Medical School faculty members. Its purpose is to offer insight into proposal development, including: proposal writing (e.g., organization, detail), responding to reviewers' comments, sample sections and tables, etc. This site is password-protected with access restricted to Medical School faculty, staff, and postdoctoral fellows.
  • Proposal Development - Additional resources provided by Research Development.

In addition to these resources, you may also consider becoming a NIH reviewer. Here are a few ways to get involved or gain insight into the NIH grant review system short of permanent study section membership:

  1. NIH Early Career Reviewer (ECR) Program - If your ECR application is accepted, you will be assigned to a study section and will receive training on review procedures, including how to write and upload critiques. You will be assigned two to four grant applications to review. You will attend a study section meeting and participate in the discussion of and voting for all applications. You will participate in no more than one study section per year and no more than twice total.
  2. Become an ad hoc member of a study section - (a) Contact the Scientific Review Officer (SRO) of the study section where you fit and send him or her your CV, asking to be considered for service; (b) Contact your professional society or research dean and let them know you are interested in being a reviewer. Ask them to add your name to the CSR list of recommended reviewers. See: How to Be a Member of a R01 Study Section (Howard Hughes Medical Institute)
Internal Subject Matter Experts

Mentees, together with their departments or coaches, will generate names of potential Internal Subject Matter Experts (ISMEs)—any established U-M faculty researcher who would be a good fit with mentees’ research fields and needs, and who is available to offer scientific guidance. Prior to the start of the program, the mentee should approach the ISME to ask about his/her willingness to participate in the R01 Boot Camp program. *Please note: A mentee’s ISME cannot be a co-investigator or consultant on the proposal.

ISMEs will provide counsel on mentees' research plans, help them prepare and present Chalk Talks, and review proposal drafts.

ISMEs are required to complete MOUs prior to September 29, 2023. MOUs ensure ISME commitment to their mentees and facilitate compensation at the end of the program.

ISMEs will be selected by the mentee in consultation with coaches, Department Chairs, and Associate Chairs for Research.

Benefits of becoming an ISME:

Through the experience of serving as an ISME, you will be able to:

  • Help guide the success of new investigators
  • Contribute to the mentee’s research design and rationale
  • Share your wisdom and insight as an experienced researcher, reviewer, and faculty member
  • Have the opportunity to learn about new technologies or methods
  • Gain entrée to some of the other R01 Boot Camp program activities
  • Contribute to the research mission of the U-M Medical School

Total estimated time commitment is approximately 16-20 hours (excluding optional components).

ISME FAQs

With the advice of his/her department, each mentee will identify and contact an Internal Subject Matter Expert (ISME) prior to the start of the R01 Boot Camp program. The ISME (i.e., a "personal scientific trainer") will advise an individual mentee on the scientific content of his/her R01 grant proposal.

Specifically, the ISME will:

  • Help the mentee identify collaborators, resources, and skills that the mentee needs in order to be competitive in a precise field of research
  • Work with mentees to plan departmental Chalk Talks    
  • Attend the mentee's departmental Chalk Talk  
  • Review all draft sections of the proposal
  • Help the mentee identify an external (outside of U-M) reviewer to critique a final draft of the proposal

The mentee should consult with chairs, coaches or colleagues to identity potential ISMEs who would be a good fit with the mentee’s needs. Prior to the start of the program, the mentee should approach the ISME to ask about his/her willingness to participate in the R01 Boot Camp program. *Please note: A mentee’s ISME cannot be a co-investigator or consultant on the proposal.

Please email [email protected] for the Internal Subject Matter Expert MOU. MOUs should be completed prior to the annual September deadline.

While the biggest compensation for serving as an ISME will be the satisfaction of contributing to the success of new investigators, the R01 Boot Camp program will compensate Internal Subject Matter Experts for their time (approximately 16-20 hours) with a salary supplement of $1,000 once mentees have submitted their R01 proposals.

Yes. ISMEs may mentor as many participants as they have the capacity for, but will not be compensated for more than 2 mentees ($2,000) in any program year.

External Subject Matter Experts

The Office of Research, on behalf of the R01 Boot Camp program, will obtain a review of a near final copy of each mentee’s R01 grant proposal from an External Subject Matter Expert (ESME).

The mentee must contact the Office of Research with the completed materials (i.e., cover sheet[JGJ1] and draft proposal) at least six weeks in advance of the NIH deadline. Once the completed review is returned to the Office of Research, the External Subject Matter Expert will receive $500 in compensation for his/her time. If you need assistance finding an ESME to review your proposal, please let us know!

Please send the following propal materials to [email protected] for review:

  1. Completed ESME Cover Sheet
  2. A copy of your almost finished grant proposal. This proposal should be as close as possible to what you plan to submit to NIH.

The ESME will be asked to return the review within two to three weeks. Please note that it is best to obtain this review six weeks in advance of your NIH deadline to allow time for further refinement and data assimilation.

General FAQs About R01 Boot Camp

In FY 2013, the national success rate at NIH for new R01-type proposals submitted by new investigators was 13%. At the U-M Medical School, professors and associate professors have higher success rates for R01 submissions than assistant professors; in U-M's FY 2013, assistant professors succeeded at slightly higher than the average NIH rate (17%), but associate and full professors had success rates significantly higher.

The message is clear – the process is competitive – and aspiring R01 Principal Investigators need to get input and reviews regarding their proposals in advance of submitting them to NIH. Their first review should not be by an NIH study section. The R01 Boot Camp has been designed to meet this need, and to help the mentee evaluate their competitive status in their scientific niche.

The program includes a department-hosted Chalk Talk to get broad-based input from their colleagues. And most importantly, they will receive multiple levels of feedback on their proposals as they are being written and before they are submitted.

For the R01 Boot Camp Program, participation will be limited to faculty members who have not yet been Principal Investigators on R01 grants.

Please see the Mentees section for more information.

Applications open annually in the spring each year.

If you have questions about the R01 Boot Camp program please contact us at [email protected].

Boot Camp mentees are expected to submit and R01-equivalent proposal within 12 months of program completion. Submission is a requirement of the program and will be verified by the Office of Research.

Additionally, Chairs are asked to acknowledge the timing requirement and commit to financial support of the program if the submission is not sent.

The goal of R01 Boot Camp is to develop an R01 application, but we also will consider “equivalent” applications, e.g., Department of Defense or American Heart Association over $500K. We understand that in the meantime mentees may apply for smaller grants, such as an internal pilot or foundation grant to gather preliminary data, but these smaller grants do not meet the R01 Boot Camp requirement for proposal submission.

The mentee is expected to submit an R01 by the identified deadline. Development of smaller proposals, e.g., R21, R03, will not qualify as a Boot Camp activity. Development of NIH K awards are not covered in the R01 Boot Camp; we encourage faculty members seeking K awards to attend the MICHR Workshop to Help Junior Faculty and Fellows Prepare K Grants.

The duration of the official academy is 9 months, with most of the meetings and activities scheduled by the mentee and his/her peer group, e.g., once a month.

There are several cohort activities scheduled:

  • Opening Ceremony (2 hours)
  • Grant writing seminar (1 day)
  • Large Group workshop (2 hours)
  • Large Group Training Opportunity (2 hours)
  • Mock Review & Closing Ceremony (2 hours)

See the Program Timeline for more information. 

For more information on the responsibilities of mentees and coaches, please see the sections above addressing the roles of both Mentees and Coaches.

  • Solicit applications from mentees and coaches
  • Endorse mentee(s) from department
  • Provide recommendations/introductions to internal and external subject matter experts
  • Provide protected time for participation in Boot Camp activities
  • Provide protected time for crafting of the R01 proposal
  • Host Chalk Talks
  • Communicate with the coaches regarding the progress and needed support for mentees from their department
  • Support coach participation in program with release time, if needed
  • Provide financial support of the R01 Boot Camp program, as required
  • Recognize mentees' and coaches' participation in program (as appropriate)
  • Have mentee report when proposal is submitted

Internal Subject Matter Experts (ISMEs) will be selected by the mentee in consultation with coaches, Department Chairs, and Associate Chairs for Research. Please see the Internal Subject Matter Experts section for more information.

Approximately six weeks before the grant is submitted, the R01 Boot Camp will pay for one external review ($500) by an experienced investigator outside of the Medical School or the U-M. This person will be chosen by the mentee in consultation with the ISME. He/she will be given a NIH-style reviewers' form to complete.

Please see the External Subject Matter Experts section for more information.

The U-M Institute for Health Policy & Innovation (IHPI) is sponsoring one team within the R01 Boot Camp program. The IHPI team has a health services research focus, and applicants who have related research aims may indicate their interest in joining the IPHI team.

For those with a primary appointment in the Medical School, the R01 Boot Camp is provided without charge – as long as the requirement for R01 (or equivalent) submission is met.  In the event that it is not, Chairs are asked to provide $1500 toward supporting the Boot Camp program. 

For any participant from another school or college, Chairs are asked to support a $3500 enrollment fee.

The supporting Chair letter is asked to acknowledge these financial requirements.

Contact Us

BMRC Bridginq Questions:
[email protected]
 

Grant Services & Analysis 
Phone: 734-763-4272 
Email: [email protected]

About Us
The BMRC (Biomedical Research Council) is a standing committee of the Medical School with a broad representation of the research faculty that helps select limited submission applicants in the health sciences, drive the bridging program, and advise MM leadership on trends in biomedical research.

The BMRC and BMRC bringing program are supported by the Grant Services & Analysis office, a unit of the Medical School Office of Research, where our mission is to foster an environment of innovation and efficiency that serves the Michigan Medicine research community and supports biomedical science from insight to impact.